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Get ‘Em While They’re Hot!

After reviewing over 100 submissions, 7 winners have been selected and their artwork has become part of the 2017 Banned Book Trading Card series!

Between SUN-SAT, September 24-30, we’ll start handing out a new card each day at our Welcome Desk for free. Collect all 7!

WINNERS: Elijah Jackson (In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak), Maya Weslander (Fun Home by Alison Bechdel), Lana Grove (The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot), Brisa Andrade (Slaughterhouse V by Kurt Vonnegut), Lora Jost (Chicano! The History of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement by F. Arturo Rosales), Chelsea Karma McKee (Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak), Johanna Harrison (The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood)


ABOUT BANNED BOOKS WEEK

Reading is essential for democracy and intellectual freedom is essential for a creative society.

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types — in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

How can you fight censorship?

1. Attend our 6th Annual Banned Books Trading Card Reveal Party on Friday, September 22!

2. Collect all 7 2017 Banned Book Trading Cards at the Welcome Desk—a new one revealed each day from 9/24–9/30!

3. Explore these recently challenged books:

  • Looking for Alaska, by John Green
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group.
  • Fifty Shades of Grey, by E. L. James
    Reasons: Sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, and other (“poorly written,” “concerns that a group of teenagers will want to try it”).
  • I Am Jazz, by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings
    Reasons: Inaccurate, homosexuality, sex education, religious viewpoint, and unsuited for age group.
  • Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out, by Susan Kuklin
    Reasons: Anti-family, offensive language, homosexuality, sex education, political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group, and other (“wants to remove from collection to ward off complaints”).
  • The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, by Mark Haddon
    Reasons: Offensive language, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group, and other (“profanity and atheism”).
  • The Holy Bible
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint.
  • Fun Home, by Alison Bechdel
    Reasons: Violence and other (“graphic images”).
  • Habibi, by Craig Thompson
    Reasons: Nudity, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group.
  • Nasreen’s Secret School: A True Story from Afghanistan, by Jeanette Winter
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group, and violence.
  • Two Boys Kissing, by David Levithan
    Reasons: Homosexuality and other (“condones public displays of affection”).

4. Explore these.

5. Get involved.

The Great Kansas State Park Tour

What’s the matter with Kansas? Absolutely nothing!

Mary Gage and Monicka Remboldt spent a year exploring all 26 of the state parks in Kansas. On TUE, September 26 from 7-8:30 PM in the Auditorium, they’ll be here to give us a virtual tour of their adventures.

Spend an evening reveling in the natural beauty of the Sunflower State, but beware, you might be inspired to dust off your hiking boots and discover those wild places for yourself!

Mary Gage Mushroom Rock

Libby—Overdrive’s New App

Libby, the innovative, new, one-tap app is designed to make borrowing and enjoying eBooks and audiobooks from your public library easier than ever. This free app, created by Overdrive, is available for Android, iOS, and Windows 10 devices. It’s super easy! Just follow these steps:


  1. Install the Libby app from your device’s app store.
  2. Open the app and find your library. You can search by library name, city, or zip code.
  3. Browse your library’s collection and borrow a title. When prompted, sign in. You’ll need a valid library card to complete this step.
  4. Borrowed titles appear on your Shelf and download to the app automatically so you can read them while you’re offline.

From your Shelf, you can:

  1. Tap Start Reading or Start Listening to open a title.
  2. Tap the cover image, then Send to Device to send a book to Kindle.

Your Ticket to the World’s Finest Cinema

You now have access to one of the largest and most unique film collections in the world.

With over 26,000 movies, documentaries, and indie and foreign films from over hundreds of producers, Kanopy includes The Criterion Collection, The Great Courses, PBS and thousands of independent filmmakers.

You’ll find an amazing array of foreign language films and films on race and LGBT issues as well. Even better (and a game changer for educators): Kanopy videos include public performance rights*!

Kanopy’s motto is “thoughtful entertainment” and aims to provide you with access to films of unique social and cultural (not just entertainment) value; films that are often difficult or impossible to access elsewhere. Kanopy’s films are also compatible for the hearing (with captions and transcripts) and visually impaired (compatible with technologies such as JAWS).

 

Kanopy service is free with a library card.
Start watching now—right here at kanopy.lplks.org.

 

*Viewing films in a group forum is permitted as long as the viewing is by authorized viewers and it is not for commercial benefit (i.e. no admission costs are charged and no profit is made from the screening).


2017 Kanopy poster RGB small for website

Get Unlimited Digital Access in English, 中文, and Español

10 free articles a month go pretty fast and the basic $195 annual subscription might feel impossibly out of reach. That’s why we’re excited to provide you digital access to the New York Times — in house and off site. Get breaking news, reviews, multimedia, and opinion on Washington, business, sports, movies, travel, books, jobs, education and more — here or wherever you find yourself in the world.


Access in the library (unlimited access to articles)

  • Connect to the Library’s WiFi or use a library computer
  • First-time users will need to register here (provide an email, create a password)
  • Returning users can log in at nytimes.com

Access off site (72 hours of unlimited access)

  • Log in (or register if it’s your first time) on your device or computer
  • Open the following URL in a new tab, then enter your library card number and 8-digit PIN for access.

Here’s a visual! New York Time how to graphic

NoveList—Your Back-up Book Squad

So, you just finished the best book ever and now you have nothing to read. Give yourself time to grieve, then get busy.

LPL librarians love to help readers find new material, but what if we’re closed, you’re out of town, or you prefer going solo and charting your own course?

NoveList connects you with read-alikes (imagine your favorite book had offspring) using the simplest of searches. Whether you’re looking for a fast-paced thriller, a bodice-ripping romance, or want to find the next book in a series, log in and watch your nightstand reading pile grow.

NoveList is accessible at all library computers. If you want to log on from your own computer, you’ll need your library card number. Hey! I need a library card!

Learn Anywhere with Lynda

Anyone with a library card can log on and start learning from Lynda.com, a vast collection of online software training in 3D, animation, audio, business, design, developer, home computer, photography, video, web + interactive, Adobe, Microsoft, Apple, and more!

Get started here — all you need is your library card!

“lynda.com excels at helping busy professionals keep their software skills razor sharp.” —Jill Duffy, PCMag.com

This resource is made possible by the generosity of the Simpson Foundation.

What Happened to the LPL App?

There a new way to carry LPL in your pocket, and it’s not from an app store. We said goodbye to the LPL app in December and replaced it with something better: Bibliocommons Mobile.

Whether you’re Android or Apple, the switch is simple and takes less than 5 minutes. If you’re familiar with saving links to your home screen, jump right in.


We think you’ll be impressed:

  • Get instant access from your home screen just like the app (that’s not changing)
  • It’s faster, easier, quicker
  • It looks and works the same on all devices
  • Seamless browsing with better lists
  • Easy to bookmark
  • It’s FREE

Why are we doing this?

  • Advances in technology​ (responsive design) make mobile browsing feel like an app
  • Having both (paying for an app while having a free site do the same thing) is duplication
  • The LPL app isn’t cheap— we’ll be able to explore other products and services for you

We’ve included steps below for making the switch. If you get stuck:

  • Stop by any of our service desks for help
  • Chat with a librarian online
  • Call 785-843-3833 for assistance
  • Chat with one of our Tech Staff at the lower level Tech Desk

NOTE: “LPL Mobile” is the name we chose when saving the link to our home screen. You can call it whatever you’d like!


Screen Shot 2016-12-18 at 5.01.08 PM

Android users: More info here.

Screen Shot 2016-11-26 at 5.00.07 PM

Apple users: See video demo on Lifehacker for more info.

Changing Your PIN Is Easy!

Changing your PIN is easy.

Follow these instructions and if you get stuck, call us. We’re here to help!

2016_Symphony Migration_PIN change handout EDITED single page

Teen Zone Expanded

Looking for something to do when school lets out early? Come hang out at the library!

On Wednesdays from 2-5 PM, we’ll take over the Auditorium or Readers’ Theater (depending on the week) for gaming, movies, crafts, and more.

Look for something different each week.