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Multicultural Storytime returns!Kids in the KitchenMysterious Mustache Book ClubPoetry PartyStorytime & Pop-Up Library in the ParkLibrary to Close April 28-May 2

Try Your Hand at Silly Poetry

We recently featured nonsense poet Edward Lear on the blog.  If you and your child loved the sound of Lear, try your own hand at writing a limerick, a fairly easy form of rhyming poem that he popularized.  A limerick is five lines long; the first, second, and fifth lines rhyme and the third and fourth lines rhyme, but are usually shorter.  It is rhythmic and often funny or naughty.  Read More..

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Edward Lear, We Hold You Dear

My Dad’s favorite poet was not Shakespeare, Shelley, or Stevenson, not Blake, Byron, or Browning.  He was not after the sublime in his poetry, but rather the silly.  And that silliness was provided by master of nonsense Edward Lear.  You may be familiar with Lear’s The Owl and the Pussycat.  Check it and his other poems out in the following books: Read More..

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Kansas Archeology – Dig it!

Have you ever dreamed of being an archeologist?

How about going on an excavation and discovering something that hasn’t been seen in hundreds of years?

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Nursery Rhymes Around the World

Reading nursery rhymes with your little one is a great way to start their journey with poetry and language.  We recently shared our favorite books of Mother Goose, but that’s only the beginning.  There is so much more out there than the old classics that we’re all familiar with.  If you want to refresh your reading routine, Read More..

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Baby’s First Poetry: Nursery Rhymes

Poetry can sometimes feel a little intimidating, so how can you celebrate National Poetry Month (April) with your little ones?  Start with the least intimidating poems of all: Mother Goose.  In addition to the joy these simple poems bring us, studies have shown that pre-schoolers who learn them become better readers Read More..

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The Other Ellis Island

Between 1910 and 1940 generations of Asian immigrants, mostly Chinese, were detained at Angel Island in the San Francisco Bay.  After weeks, or even months of detention, those who passed the interrogation and examination were allowed to continue on to San Francisco and the country that many Chinese knew as Gold Mountain.  The less fortunate were sent back home, Read More..

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