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banned books week

Winners Revealed and Collecting Begins!

Celebrate your freedom to read all week by collecting a new Banned Book Trading Card each day at the Welcome Desk.

The 2016 edition includes an unprecedented 8th card! Here’s the release schedule:

We had 8 stunning finalists, so we made an exception this year to add a BONUS CARD!


BBTC 2016 winners

SUN, 9/25/16
Two Boys Kissing | (Lana Grove)

MON, 9/26/16
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks | (Charley Forsyth)

TUE, 9/27/16
The Jungle | (Tyler Jones)

WED, 9/28/16
The Color Purple | (Charlotte Pemberton)

THU, 9/29/16
Annie on My Mind | (Myka Small)

FRI, 9/30/16
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time | (Anne Patterson)

SAT, 10/1/16 — Special Double Feature
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings | (Ursula Minor)
A People’s History of the United States | (Dave Loewenstein)

5 Ways to Celebrate Your Freedom to Read

Reading is essential for democracy and intellectual freedom is essential for a creative society.

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types — in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

How can you fight censorship?

1. Attend our 5th Annual Banned Books Trading Card Reveal Party on Friday, September 23.

2. Collect all 7 2016 Banned Book Trading Cards at the Welcome Desk—a new one revealed each day from 9/25–10/1!

3. Explore these recently challenged books from 2015:

  • Looking for Alaska, by John Green
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group.
  • Fifty Shades of Grey, by E. L. James
    Reasons: Sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, and other (“poorly written,” “concerns that a group of teenagers will want to try it”).
  • I Am Jazz, by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings
    Reasons: Inaccurate, homosexuality, sex education, religious viewpoint, and unsuited for age group.
  • Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out, by Susan Kuklin
    Reasons: Anti-family, offensive language, homosexuality, sex education, political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group, and other (“wants to remove from collection to ward off complaints”).
  • The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, by Mark Haddon
    Reasons: Offensive language, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group, and other (“profanity and atheism”).
  • The Holy Bible
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint.
  • Fun Home, by Alison Bechdel
    Reasons: Violence and other (“graphic images”).
  • Habibi, by Craig Thompson
    Reasons: Nudity, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group.
  • Nasreen’s Secret School: A True Story from Afghanistan, by Jeanette Winter
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group, and violence.
  • Two Boys Kissing, by David Levithan
    Reasons: Homosexuality and other (“condones public displays of affection”).

4. Explore these.

5. Get involved.

 

 

Banned Book Trading Cards V: The Quest for Diversity

Diversity is the theme for this year’s Banned Books Week. How do we define diversity? Check out ALA’s post on the many definitions, and the boons and problems with each one. A majority of banned and challenged books are by or about people who have been marginalized because of their skin color, gender, sexual orientation, religion, ethnicity, or ability.

We are asking Lawrence artists of all skill levels and ages to create works of art based on their favorite banned or challenged book. Of course, we want you to pick a book that speaks to you artistically, but we’d like submissions to focus on books that have been challenged because they offer insight into the lives of marginalized characters or populations. Check out ALA’s Banned Books Week page for inspiration and a list of frequently banned or challenged books. We Need Diverse Books is also an excellent resource!

Scroll down to the bottom of the page to see past year’s selections.


The nuts and bolts of submission:

  • Create a 5”x7” original artwork based on a book that has been banned or challenged. If the piece is a copy of your original artwork, it will be scaled to 5”x7’ for uniformity.

  • Include its title, author, and a few sentences about how the piece represents the book.

  • Include your name, address, phone, and email.

  • Submissions may be in either landscape or portrait orientation.

  • For digital submissions: Save file in PNG or JPG format at 300 dpi minimum.

Submission deadline is Sep 1.

Banned Book Trading Card Unveiling is Friday, September 23rd at 5pm in the Library Auditorium.

Find out what pieces were selected to become Banned Book Trading Cards!

During Banned Books Week, we’ll display all submissions at the library. A panel of judges will select seven works to be printed and distributed as banned book trading cards. We’ll hand out a different card each day of the Banned Books Week.

Drop off, or mail entries to:

Kristin Soper
Lawrence Public Library
707 Vermont Street
Lawrence, KS 66044
ksoper@lawrencepubliclibrary.org

IMAGE: Detail of 2013 winning artist Leah Hoelscher’s, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

 

 

Lawrence Reads Banned Books!

Books have the power to change lives on the individual and societal level. They’re portals to magical lands and guides for navigating life’s most gruesome struggles. Because of this, the freedom to access information through books has been highly contested since the birth of the written word. The American Library’s Association (ALA) has reported that it tracked roughly 500 requests to challenge or ban books from schools and libraries each year. Thus, Banned Books Week was created. The first Banned Books week began in 1982 as a celebration that called attention to the dangers of stifling creative expression and access to books.  Banned Books Week focuses on readers’ freedom and open access to information, and also acts as a Thank You to the librarians, teachers, students, and community members who have fought for these freedoms.

Read More..

Battle of the Banned… Books!

Welcome to our 4th annual Banned Book Trading Cards Competition!

Banned books week celebrates the freedom to read and the importance of open access to information by highlighting the attempted or actual banning of books in the US.

During banned books week, we’ll display all submissions at the Library. A panel of judges will select seven submissions for printing and distribution and we’ll hand out a different selection each day of the week.

For inspiration, here’s a list of frequently challenged books compiled by The American Libraries Association.

Requirements: Submit original artwork only. A brief artist’s statement
about the work must accompany each entry. Include the name of the banned
or challenged book, author that inspired the piece, and 1-2 paragraphs
about how the piece represents the book or author. Please include name, address,
phone number, and email address. Selected pieces will be scanned on a
flatbed scanner for printing. At the conclusion of Banned Books Week, all artwork
will be returned to the artists, with the option of donating their original art to the
Library.

 

Medium: paper
Size: 5” x 7” + 300dpi high resolution
Due by: August 31st
Where to submit: Drop off entries or mail to -
Lawrence Public Library, attn: Kristin Soper
700 New Hampshire Street
Lawrence, KS 66044
ksoper@lawrencepubliclibrary.org

 

Banned Books Week Virtual Read-Out: “The Chamber of Secrets” by J.K. Rowling

Read by TAB member, Meredith S.

Thanks for participating in Banned Books Week, Meredith!

 

Banned Books Virtual Read-Out: “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” by Stephen Chbosky

Read by TAB member, Tehreem C. 

Thanks for participating in Banned Books Week, Tehreem!

Banned Books Virtual Read-Out:”Just Listen” by Sarah Dessen

Read by TAB member, Lauren B. 

Thanks for participating in Banned Books Week, Lauren!

Celebrate the Freedom to Read

It’s Banned Books Week and we’re holding a virtual read -out all week long to recognize the importance of the freedom of information.  Choose an excerpt from your favorite banned or challenged book, come to the Teen Zone, and be recorded reading your excerpt. We’ll share your reading on the American Library Association’s dedicated YouTube channel as well as on our website.

Please limit your reading to two minutes. You will need to bring a photo/video consent form signed by your parent/guardian with you to the library.

You can also collect seven banned book trading cards designed by local artists, and of course, pick up a challenged book and celebrate your freedom to read!