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LGBTQIA

Deja’s Reading Rainbow

We’ve got a superstar guest joining us for an all-ages storytime this month! Miss Deja Brooks will be here Sunday, December 10th at 3:30 PM in the Auditorium with stories celebrating our local LGBTQIA+ community, families of all kinds, fun, and of course—RAINBOWS!

Following the lead of Harvey Milk Memorial Library and Brooklyn Public Library, we’re hoping our own version of drag queen storytime is as sparkly and glamorous as it is a safe space for, “positive, and unabashedly queer role models…where kids can imagine a world where people can present as they wish, where dress up is real.” (SOURCE: Drag Queen Story Hour)

 

Sunday Storytime…She’s Baaaack!

On SundayOctober 8th at 3:30 PM in the Auditorium, Miss Deja Brooks returns for an all-ages storytime with stories celebrating our local LGBTQIA+ community, families of all kinds, fun, and of course—RAINBOWS!

Over 200 people came out for Miss Deja’s premiere at the library in June 2017! Party pix are here!

Following the lead of Harvey Milk Memorial Library and Brooklyn Public Library, we’re hoping our own version of drag queen storytime is as sparkly and glamorous as it is a safe space for, “positive, and unabashedly queer role models…where kids can imagine a world where people can present as they wish, where dress up is real.” (SOURCE: Drag Queen Story Hour)

2017 Deja's Reading Rainbow 600 dpi

Finding Pride in the Stacks

“We read books to find out who we are. What other people, real or imaginary, do and think and feel…is an essential guide to our understanding of what we ourselves are and may become.” – Ursula K. Le Guin

For me, the public library has always been place of possibility and self-discovery.  As a gay youth growing up in a small, predominantly Christian and conservative community, I didn’t feel comfortable accepting my true self, let alone trying to relate to others about it. Huddled in the stacks reading, it was in the books on the shelves of my local library that I first discovered I wasn’t alone, that other people felt the same as I did and had experienced similar journeys.pridebooks1 Read More..

Film + Discussion: Gender Revolution

Follow Katie Couric through the journey that is our blossoming definition of gender and identity.

Join us Thursday, June 8 from 7-9 PM in the Auditorium for a screening of National Geographic’s Gender Revolution followed by a Q&A and discussion.

Lawrence Public Library is a safe environment to learn more, ask questions, and expand your knowledge base about the complexities of gender identity. This event is free and open to the public.


About the Presenters

An Sasala (they/them) is a Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies graduate student at KU. An studies transgender/non-binary identities and issues in relation to race, gender, sexuality, class, and robots and volunteers with the Kansas Statewide Transgender Education Project.

Megan Williams (she/her) is the KU Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity’s program coordinator. Meg earned her PhD in American Studies from KU. To her position at the Emily Taylor Center, Meg brings over a decade of experience teaching women, gender, and sexuality studies to undergraduates at KU and Johnson County Community College in Kansas and at Skidmore College and The College of Saint Rose in Upstate NY.

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We Need Diverse Books! Book Drive

Ready to pass on some life-affirming (and possibly life-saving) books to young people struggling to make their way in the world? Bring them to us so we can help set up a collection at the Boys & Girls Club of Lawrence.

We’re hosting a We Need Diverse Books Drive at LPL where you can drop off new or gently used books (check out their tumblr for tons of inspiration, book ideas, and more information about the campaign) at our Welcome Desk through Friday, Jan 27.

The We Need Diverse Books campaign, “recognizes all diverse experiences, including (but not limited to) LGBTQIA, Native, people of color, gender diversity, people with disabilities*, and ethnic, cultural, and religious minorities,” and operates with the vision that all children will be able to see themselves within the books they read.

*We subscribe to a broad definition of disability, which includes but is not limited to physical, sensory, cognitive, intellectual, or developmental disabilities, chronic conditions, and mental illnesses (this may also include addiction). Furthermore, we subscribe to a social model of disability, which presents disability as created by barriers in the social environment, due to lack of equal access, stereotyping, and other forms of marginalization.