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Social Justice

Hope for Social Justice

I am hopeful that this 4th of July will inspire more than just a feeling of patriotism or nationalism. I am hopeful that it will instead encourage hope for social justice and move away from a nationalism that leans dangerously toward prejudice and injustices—especially during this national holiday.

I offer the books highlighted here as powerful tools for instilling hope to energize us towards social justice work and unify our differences.

Local author Diane Silver is writing a series of books using hope as daily meditations. Her first, Your Daily Shot of Hope, is a positive way to counter aggression and prejudice expressed by politicians. Meditating on hope becomes energizing fuel—energizing us to stand up to injustices and allowing us to trust that we can make a positive change if we take action. Read More..

Six Months in ’61 That Changed America Forever

Meet one of the women from the 1963 Woolworth’s Lunch Counter Sit-In that happened in Jackson, Mississippi.

Growing up in Arlington, Virginia, Joan Trumpauer Mulholland witnessed firsthand the ugly realities of segregation and racism. Vowing to ally herself with anti racists, Mulholland joined the Freedom Riders to fight against injustice. Mulholland’s social justice activism eventually led her to death row in Mississippi’s notorious Parchman Penitentiary.

We are honored to offer two events, in partnership with Eudora Public Library, detailing an incredible story of white allyship during the Civil Rights movement.

Film Screening: An Ordinary Hero
THU | Mar 16 | 7-8:30 PM | Auditorium
From the website: “An Ordinary Hero” is the amazing true story of one woman’s courage to help change the world. By the time she was 19 years old, legendary Civil Rights Activists, Joan Trumpauer Mulholland participated in over three dozen sit-ins and protests she was put on death row in Mississippi’s notorious Parchman Penitentiary with other Freedom Riders. She was involved in one of the most famous and violent sit-ins of the Movement at the Jackson Woolworth’s lunch counter and helped plan and organize the March on Washington.

A Conversation with Freedom Rider Joan Trumpauer Mulholland
SAT | Mar 18 | 11AM–12:30 PM | Auditorium

Representative Barbara Ballard will talk with Mulholland about her experience as a Freedom Rider and the trials she endured as a white ally.

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Visit the film’s website for more of the story.
View the official trailer:

The Internet’s Own Boy: An Urgent Heartbreaker

“Moving and maddening in almost equal measure.”

How are social justice and the economics of information access intertwined?

Meet us in the Library Auditorium on Tuesday, Oct 25 from 6-8:30 PM for a film screening about what we lose when we are, “tone deaf about technology and its relationship to our civil liberties.” Stay for a discussion about open access to scholarly research led by Josh Bolick, Scholarly Communications Librarian at KU.

ABOUT THE FILM: The Internet’s Own Boy follows the story of programming prodigy, information activist, and internet celebrity Aaron Swartz, and a two-year legal battle that ended with him taking his own life at the age of 26.

From Swartz’s help in the development of the basic internet protocol RSS to his co-founding of Reddit, his fingerprints are all over the internet. But it was Swartz’s groundbreaking work in social justice and political organizing combined with his aggressive approach to information access that ensnared him in a legal nightmare. (Source: takepart.com)

Co-sponsored by the KU Libraries Shulenburger Office of Scholarly Communication & Copyright

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Drawing the Line: Comics for Social Change

SUN | Apr 17 | 5 PM | Auditorium

Using examples of their recent publishing project, “Drawing the Line: Indian Women Fight Back!”, this presentation will focus on the benefits of using comic books to talk social justice – from marginalized histories to modern-day experiences of sexism, from political satire of the powerful, to the do’s and don’t's of being an ally, comics offer a unique capacity to engage, inform, and entertain.