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staff picks

Staff Picks: “Splintered” by A. G. Howard

I’ve always been intrigued by idea of falling down a rabbit hole to discover an otherworldly realm full of magical creatures, so I was excited to read Splintered by A. G. Howard, an updated re-imagining of Alice in Wonderland.

Alyssa is a skateboarding artist who makes murals out of dead bugs she captures herself. She hears the voices of flowers. She is also the descendant of Alice Liddell, the little girl who inspired Lewis Carroll’s original Alice in Wonderland. Read More..

Staff Pick: Fashion Plates!

I saw this book sitting on the adult new book shelf and immediately picked it up. I’m not artistically inclined, but I love looking at fashion drawings, especially if they are period dresses. If you have an artistic flair, How to Draw and Paint Fashion and Costume Design will give you step by step instructions for fashion styles from the 1920′s through the 1960s, and even some period costume ideas. This book could easily fit into the young adult collection, by why not explore the adult shelves as well? Of course, it’s checked out now, but put yourself on hold and you’re sure to get it soon after we open in our temporary space at 700 New Hampshire.

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Staff Picks: A Fantastical Take on the Dust Bowl of the 1930s

Dust Girl is quite the fantastic journey. It centers around Callie who has grown up with an overprotective and somewhat mentally disabled mother. They run the only bed in breakfast in a small Kansas town that has been plagued by the dust storms of the 1930′s. During the worst storm, Callie’s mother disappears and out of the dust emerges a being who tells Callie she’s not quite human. Read More..

God is a teenaged boy?

What if Earth was ruled by a young being named Bob? And, what would happen to the world if he kept crushing on one Earth girl after another? Floods and droughts within the same week? Meg Rosoff posits just this type of world in her book, There is no DogRead More..

Staff Picks: “Finnikin of the Rock” and “Froi of the Exiles” by Melina Marchetta

Some novels are just not for everyone, and that’s okay. If everyone liked the same books, a lot of authors would be out of work (and book clubs would be boring). I’d read great reviews of The Lumatere Chronicles by Melina Marchetta, but some people I know had given them a big thumbs down, so I had to investigate for myself. In just two days, I fell in love with Melina Marchetta’s epic fantasy Finnikin of the Rock. I was completely engrossed in the story of these amazing characters as they journeyed through the kingdoms of Skulendore.

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Staff Picks: “Days of Blood and Starlight” by Laini Taylor

“Once upon a time, an angel and a devil fell in love and dared to imagine a world free of bloodshed and war.

This is not that world.”

Last year, when Daughter of Smoke and Bone ended with Karou sneaking through a slit in the sky, I couldn’t believe I’d have to wait so many months to find out what happens next. Luckily, it was worth the wait. As much as I loved Daughter of Smoke and Bone, Days of Blood and Starlight was better.

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Staff Pick: “Between the Lines” by Jodi Picoult and Samantha van Leer

Between the Lines by Jodi Picoult and Samantha van Leer

What is it about? Delilah is a bit of a loner who prefers spending her time in the school library with her head in a book—one book in particular. Between the Lines may be a fairy tale, but it feels real. Prince Oliver is brave, adventurous, and loving. He really speaks to Delilah. And then one day Oliver actually speaks to her. Read More..

Staff Picks: “Beta” by Rachel Cohn

Rachel Cohn is best known for Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist and Dash and Lily’s Book of Dares, two popular contemporary and realistic young adult novels. When I saw she was coming out with a science fiction dystopian novel, I was intrigued.

Beta is set on the otherworldly island of Demesne, where the air is so full of oxygen, the environment so lush, it seems like paradise. The island is staffed by clones made from the bodies of those who have died, and these clones serve the elite humans who make Demesne their home. Elysia is one of the first teen clones, making her a Beta. Read More..

Staff Picks: “Crewel” by Gennifer Albin

So, there are a lot of dystopian YA novels out there, and a whole new crop of them this fall. In fact, there were so many I had to update my If you liked The Hunger Games”  flowchart (and I still feel like I’m leaving some out).

Despite the seemingly endless supply of novels about a teen challenging the authority of their seemingly perfect yet obviously malicious society, none are quite like Crewel by Gennifer Albin.

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Staff Picks: “Time Between Us” by Tamara Ireland Stone

Since I read A Wrinkle in Time, I have been fascinated with time travel. Whether it involved going back into the past or light-years into the future I was always intrigued by these kind of stories. Though I have never been much of a science nerd, I blazed through Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History of Time, especially the chapter on wormholes and time travel.

But at the end of the day, what really draws me into a book is the love story, so I was interested to read Time Between Us by Tamara Ireland Stone. Read More..