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Tornadoes

Nerd Nite 27: Earth, Wind, and Fire

 

 

 

 

Nothing says spring in Kansas like Earth, Wind, and Fire. If you want to dig deeper on the subject, our presenters have put together some great resources for your perusal.

Don’t know what Nerd Nite is? Check out our local page (http://lawrence.nerdnite.com) for speaker bios and the origin story involving a bar, a nerd, and an indigo bird!

And you should probably put a hold on this, since we’re all thinking it anyway (unfortunately we just have one Earth, Wind, and Fire album, something that will be remedied soon).

Design on the Land: The Development of Landscape Architecture

With the role of the landscape architect increasing in importance, this first comprehensive survey of the art and practice of landscape architecture fills a great need. Norman T. Newton has included over 400 illustrations in his book, which conveys a basic understanding of the aims and scope of landscape architecture and offers visual analyses of major historic works, each in the context of its own time. The first third of the study is concerned with landscape architecture in the Western world, mainly Europe, from ancient times to the mid-nineteenth century. But the major part of the work is devoted to the development of landscape architecture in the century that has passed since it acquired the status of a profession and an independent discipline. Concentrating primarily on the United States, Mr. Newton reviews his subject from its beginnings in colonial days to the work of Olmsted, Vaux, Cleveland, Weidenmann, Eliot, Platt, and the founders of the American Society of Landscape Architects. He discusses the Columbian Exposition of 1893, the “City Beautiful” movement and the growth of city planning, the Country Place Era, town planning in England and America, American national and state parks, parkways, urban open spaces, and recent variations in professional practice. Mr. Newton concludes his book with a timely discussion of the vital role that landscape architecture plays in the conservation of natural resources and in protection of the environment.

Architecture: Form, Space, and Order

For more than thirty years, the beautifully illustrated Architecture: Form, Space, and Order has been the classic introduction to the basic vocabulary of architectural design. The updated Third Edition features expanded sections on circulation, light, views, and site context, along with new considerations of environmental factors, building codes, and contemporary examples of form, space, and order.

This classic visual reference helps both students and practicing architects understand the basic vocabulary of architectural design by examining how form and space are ordered in the built environment. Using his trademark meticulous drawing, Professor Ching shows the relationship between fundamental elements of architecture through the ages and across cultural boundaries. By looking at these seminal ideas, Architecture: Form, Space, and Order encourages the reader to look critically at the built environment and promotes a more evocative understanding of architecture.

The Tornado: Nature’s Ultimate Windstorm

tornado

Filled with dramatic accounts of tornado touchdowns, this book addresses the whirlwind of questions surrounding the phenomenon of the tornado. How often does a tornado hit a particular location? How fast are the winds? Do tornadoes really seek out trailer parks? Can they actually defeather a chicken? How many tornadoes hit the United States every year? How big can tornadoes grow? Thomas P. Grazulis, a tornado research meteorologist and founder of the Tornado Project, has been a consultant for television specials including Cyclone (National Geographic), Target Tornado (The Weather Channel), Forces of Nature (CBS), and others, providing answers to these questions for the general public. Here he sets the record straight about tornado risk, the Fujita Scale, and the number of tornadoes occurring annually. He also sheds light on misconceptions and contradictory theories about tornadoes. Recreating the incredible drama so often accompanying interactions between people and tornadoes. The Tornado: Nature’s Ultimate Windstorm provides detailed meteorological and statistical information on these marvels of nature, which are among the most fascinating scientific puzzles on the planet.–BOOK JACKET. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

Storm Kings: The Untold History of America’s First Tornado Chasers

storm kinds

James Espy, the first meteorologist in America, thought of tornadoes as “rapidly rising column[s] of air” that operated according to the laws of steam power, pumping warm air into cold; his lifelong rival, William Redfield, maintained that the storms were “gigantic whirlwind[s], spinning around a moving center like a top.” Though they were essentially espousing “two halves of the same process,” they were never able to reconcile their differences and find common ground. Sandlin, however, deftly synthesizes and illuminates the duality of his title-both the tornado itself, which early settlers in America referred to as “the Storm King”; and the individuals who made it their life’s work to document, predict, and better understand those despots of the plains. Legendary storms roil throughout the text, from the funnel of fire-or as one eyewitness (whose eyeballs were consequently seared) described it, “the finger of God”-that destroyed Peshtigo, Wis., in 1871, scorching over a million acres and killing 1,500 people, to the Tristate Tornado of 1925, which rampaged for 219 miles across parts of Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana. On ground level, Sandlin describes mankind’s efforts to comprehend storms, from Ben Franklin’s famous kite experiment to the F1-5 intensity rating system developed by Japanese immigrant Tetsuya Fujita. Sandlin makes talking about the weather much more than a conversational nicety-he makes it come brilliantly to life. 16 pages of b&w illus. Agent: Danielle Egan-Miller, Browne and Miller Literary Associates. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

 

Tornado Alley: Monster Storms of the Great Plains

tornado alley

Bluestein, a professor of meteorology at the University of Oklahoma, has been pursuing tornadoes since long before storm-chasing emerged as a hobby of choice for thrill seekers. Though his motivation is primarily scientific, he acknowledges the role awe plays in his quest to understand these violent yet magnificent storms. He invites readers to accompany him on his two decades of storm-tracking through the famed “Tornado Alley” of the American Great Plains. When Bluestein points excitedly at a tornado or cloud formation, he directs the reader’s gaze not to the power of the event alone, but also to details of its form and dynamics. In doing so, he employs the straightforward and often detailed discourse of the enthusiastic scientist discussing the topic that has driven his intellectual life. The book’s historical organization traces the development of severe-weather science through the last half-century, from early anecdotal observations to today’s high-technology measurements. The story ends where it began: at the dawn of a new quest into fuller understanding of the origin and development of these monster storms, demanding ever more detailed observations using ever advancing technology, plus an ample dose of old-fashioned human curiosity and awe. Myriad illustrations and vivid photographs, many of which Bluestein himself shot, help break up the dense technical prose. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

 

Economic and Societal Impacts of Tornadoes

economic and societal impacts of tornadoes

For almost a decade, economists Kevin M. Simmons and Daniel Sutter have been studying the economic impacts and social consequences of the approximately 1,200 tornadoes that touch down across the United States annually. During this time, Simmons and Sutter have been compiling information from sources such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Census in order to examine the casualties caused by tornadoes and to evaluate the National Weather Service’s efforts to reduce these casualties. In Economic and Societal Impacts of Tornadoes, Simmons and Sutter present their findings. This analysis will be extremely useful to anyone studying meteorology and imperative for anyone working in emergency disaster management.

 

 

 

The Charcoal Foundry

charcoal foundry

If you can build a sand castle or make a mud pie you can make a sand mold to produce castings for your metal shop projects. It really is cheap and easy with a simple solid fuel furnace.Here are plans to build the melting furnace and instructions for basic pattern making and molding to get your shop project under way. Charcoal is the fuel and aluminum and zinc alloys are the metals to cast. None of the pulsation or roar associated with gas fired furnaces. Build your own molding bench and flasks. Make your own melting pots and most of the simple tools required. Discover how cheap and easy it is.Even if you already have a lathe and other equipment this simple foundry setup will greatly expand the capacity of your shop by providing you with a supply of cheap castings for your projects.Discover why so many shop hands say “Metal Casting has opened a whole new world of shop experience”. Heavily illustrated with many photographs that will show you step – by – step how to build a foundry.

 

 

 

Building a Gas Fired Crucible Furnace

crucible furnace

Dave designed this furnace especially for the home shop foundry. Very quiet in operation. Easy to light and simple to operate. The body and lid raise for safer crucible handling. Operates on natural or bottled gas. Costs only a fraction of the price of a commercially built unit and it will melt aluminum, brass and even gray iron.

 

 

 

 

The best page on the net for hobby foundry & casting ideas.

The best forum on the net for nearer-to-professional quality foundry & casting advice.