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University of Kansas

Wonder Genes

Learn all about genes and DNA from science experts from KU! You can extract your own DNA plus more from 4-5 PM in the Auditorium on Wednesday, February 28th! Program is for ages 5-11!

Nerd Nite 68: A Most Wonderful Read Across Lawrence

Nerd Nite is like the Discovery Channel — with beer — and on Wednesday, FEB 7 from 8-10:30 PM at Maceli’s, we’re partnering up to celebrate Read Across Lawrence and a variety of themes in our community read pick: Wonder by R.J. Palacio.

Haven’t finished the book yet? No worries! Nerd Night 68′s presentations won’t spoil the book for you.

Doors open at 7, $1 cover charge, and we’ll get things going at 8 PM. It’s going to be Wonderful!


Nerd Nite 68 Presentations

“The Future is Now: Clinical Genetics as the Forerunner of Precision Medicine,” by Eric Rush

Discoveries in genetics that impact the health of humans are in the news daily. While these advances are exciting, did you ever wonder who actually uses them to improve patient care? Enter Clinical Geneticists. We are clinicians who use our eyes, our brains, and ever-expanding cytogenetic and molecular testing to diagnose patients with genetic conditions. We use this knowledge to treat our patients either symptomatically or with targeted molecular therapies. The paradigm of giving a patient the correct treatment, at the correct dose, and at the correct time is the essence of what has come to be called Precision Medicine. We in Genetics have been approaching our patients in this fashion for the past fifty years. We will discuss the history of Clinical Genetics and how this relates to our current medical practice.

“The Creative Outsider, or Why Marginalized People Make the Best Innovators,” by Barbara Kerr

Kerr will talk about her research on creative, eminent women for her book “Smart Girls” and eminent men for her book “Smart Boys” — and show how long periods of aloneness, rejection by popular peers, and distance from privilege can stir the imagination. The importance of one good friend and a family that provides both challenge and refuge also helps in the development of the creative person.

“‘The Wonderful[?] World of Disney’: Film Adaptations of Popular Children’s Narratives,” by Giselle Anatol

Anatol will explore several popular Disney films from the 1930s to the present and juxtapose them with the stories on which they are based. She will consider changes to the original tales and how those provide clues to the historical and cultural contexts in which both versions were created. She will also consider the messages both versions send to viewers about a variety of ideas, such as gender roles, romantic love, and beauty ideals.


Presenters

Dr. Eric Rush is a Clinical Geneticist at Children’s Mercy Hospital and the University of Kansas Hospital and is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. As a high school student, he became interested in genetics when learning of the cause of his own color-blindness. He graduated from the University of Kansas with degrees in biochemistry and genetics in 2001, and graduated from the University of Kansas School of Medicine in 2005. Between 2005 and 2017, Eric took his show on the road, completing his training in Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Clinical Genetics at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and staying on the faculty for five years after training. His research interests include treatment of rare genetic bone conditions and discovery of new syndromes.

Barbara Kerr is Distinguished Professor of Counseling Psychology and Co-Director of the new Center for Creativity and Entrepreneurship in Education at KU. She is also co-founder of the Lawrence Creates Makerspace. Her life’s mission is to make the world safe for creative people, but she worries it is becoming less, rather than more so. She studies how creative talent develops and the conditions that encourage it in the family, school, work, and cultures. She is author of the “Smart Girls in the Twenty-first Century: The Development of Talent in Women;” “Smart Boys: Talent, Manhood, the Search for Meaning,” seven other books and over a hundred articles. Her most recent is “Creativity and Innovation in Iceland: Individual and Cultural Variables.”

Giselle Anatol is a Professor of English at KU. Anatol’s primary fields of interest are Caribbean and Caribbean Diaspora Literature, especially 20th- and 21st-century women’s writing, African American Literature, and Children’s and Young Adult Literature, particularly representations of race, ethnicity, and gender in narratives for young people.

RAL Maceli's Nerd Nite logo

 

Diverse Dialogues Series presents Pero Dagbovie

Representations of African American history in U.S. politics and popular culture will the the focus of this round of Diverse Dialogues with Pero G. Dagbovie, on Thursday, JAN 18 from 7-8:30 PM in our Auditorium.

Dagbovie is professor of African American history and Associate Dean in The Graduate School at Michigan State University.

His research and teaching interests comprise a range time periods, themes, and topical specialties, including black intellectual history, the history of the black historical enterprise, black women’s history, black life during “the Nadir,” the civil rights-Black Power movement, African American Studies, hip hop culture, and contemporary black history.

Diverse Dialogues is an ongoing series offered in partnership with the Langston Hughes Center.

DNA for Genealogists

Have you had your DNA tested and puzzled over the results?

On Wednesday, DEC 6 from 6:30–8 PM, KU researcher Dr. Kristine G. Beaty will be here to discuss how biological anthropologists use DNA to better understand human populations, and explore the pros and cons of using your genome to understand your history, identity, and health. Meet up in the Auditorium and bring questions about your own DNA results!

Connect with Melissa for more info: mfisherisaacs@lplks.org

 

All About the Book

Explore the book not simply as a container of content, but a “meaningful physical object that has shaped the way we understand the world around us.”

Starting Wednesday, NOV 8, this 4-part series focuses one of our favorite topics—books!—with insight and expertise from KU faculty and staff.

Adults and Teens welcome! Free, but registration is required for the Kenneth Spencer Research Library Special Collections Tour. Questions? Email Ian: istepp@lplks.org.


BOOK LEARNIN’

WED | Nov 8 | 7-8 PM | Auditorium
Dr. Anne D Hedeman: Shaping the Medieval Illuminated Manuscript

WED | Nov 15 | 7-8 PM | Auditorium
Dr. Elspeth Healey: A Past You Can Touch: History of the Book in the Collections of the Kenneth Spencer Research Library

WED | Nov 29 | 7-8 PM | Auditorium
Dr. Jonathan Lamb: From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg: the Typographical Revolution in Retrospect

TOUR

FRI | Dec 8 | 2 PM | Kenneth Spencer Research Library Special Collections
Register with Ian: istepp@lplks.org.


QUOTE SOURCE: Harvard University

 

Diverse Dialogues Presents: Class, Race, and Marxism

On MondayOCT 30 from 7-8:30 PM in the Auditorium, join KU American Studies professors David Roediger and Elizabeth Esch, and Tony Bolden (KU African and African-American Studies professor) for a discussion around Roediger’s latest book, Class, Race, and Marxism.

Roediger’s influential work on working people who have come to identify as white has so illuminated questions of identity that its grounding in Marxism has sometimes been missed. This new volume implicitly and explicitly reminds us that his ideas, and the best studies of whiteness generally come from within the Marxist tradition.

In his historical studies of the intersections of race, settler colonialism, and slavery, in his major chapter (with Elizabeth Esch) on race and the management of labor, in his detailing of the origins of critical studies of whiteness within Marxism, and in his reflections on the history of solidarity, Roediger argues that racial divisions not only tell us about the history of capitalism but also shed light on the logic of capital (from versobooks.com).

This event is in partnership with the Langston Hughes Center, the Lawrence Public Library and the Department of African and African-American Studies.

Diverse Dialogues David Roediger KU logos

 

 

 

 

New Series: Social Media Marketing for Beginners

Not certain where to begin your business’s or non-profit’s social media marketing strategy?

Learn the basics from local celebs and social media gurus in this 4-part series every Thursday, OCT 12–NOV 2 at 7-8:30 PM in our Auditorium.


SCHEDULE

Developing A Social Media Plan
THU | Oct 12 | 7-8:30 PM | Auditorium
Developments in information technology and online social networking have posed opportunities and challenges for businesses and organizations. In this first session, Hyunjin Seo, Associate Professor of Strategic Communication at the University of Kansas, will teach you how to develop a social media plan that supports your organizational goals. Come and learn effective ways to identify key demographics, create and share social media content, and evaluate social media-based initiatives.

Twitter Marketing Basics
THU | Oct 19 | 7-8:30 PM | Auditorium
The immediacy of Twitter feeds attract many users, but can be overwhelming to the uninitiated. In this second session, Lawrence Public Library’s William Ottens will cover Twitter marketing basics for businesses and nonprofits while Officer Drew Fennelly (winner of 2017′s Best of Lawrence: Social Media Organization or Nonprofit) will share Lawrence Police Department’s success story.

Facebook Marketing Basics
THU | Oct 26 | 7-8:30 PM | Auditorium
Managing a Facebook page for a business or nonprofit organization can often feel like a full-time endeavor. For this third session, Lawrence Public Library’s Marketing Coordinator Heather Kearns and the owner of Ladybird Diner Meg Heriford will put their heads together to discuss the basics of managing a Facebook page for a business or organization along with some tips and tricks to succeed in connecting with the Lawrence community.

Social Media Copyright and Fair Use
THU | Nov 2 | 7-8:30 PM | Auditorium
Copyright and fair use are so fundamental to 21st century life that we frequently fail to recognize them. This is particularly true on the web and in social media, where copying and sharing are as easy as a few clicks. It’s important to have a basic understanding of copyright and fair use from both legal and ethical perspectives. In this fourth and final session, Josh Bolick, KU Libraries’ Scholarly Communications Librarian, will teach you the basics of copyright and fair use and how they work in social media contexts with specific examples, strategies, and time for discussion.

Words in Your Ears

Join the Book Squad’s Polli and Kate on Soundcloud to catch their latest wits (and greatest hits).

Once a month, the librarians are in, with their favorite recommendations in Two Book Minimum, a toe-to-toe discussion on a book or topic in She Said/She Said, as well as news from the book world, updates from Lawrence Public Library, Audio Reader programs, and beyond.

Click on the red button to play! 

Book Squad Podcast web banner

 


Show Notes by Episode:

Fitness Sampler Classes Every Friday on the Lawn

Back by popular demand, we’ve teamed up with area fitness instructors and gyms to bring you something new to add to your workout routine.

Every Friday through July 28, we’ll meet from 7-8 AM (before it gets unbearably hot!) for an hour of community exercise. We’ll provide water—just bring a towel so you don’t get chiggers from the grass.


Fitness Fridays Poster HK edits

Film + Discussion: Gender Revolution

Follow Katie Couric through the journey that is our blossoming definition of gender and identity.

Join us Thursday, June 8 from 7-9 PM in the Auditorium for a screening of National Geographic’s Gender Revolution followed by a Q&A and discussion.

Lawrence Public Library is a safe environment to learn more, ask questions, and expand your knowledge base about the complexities of gender identity. This event is free and open to the public.


About the Presenters

An Sasala (they/them) is a Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies graduate student at KU. An studies transgender/non-binary identities and issues in relation to race, gender, sexuality, class, and robots and volunteers with the Kansas Statewide Transgender Education Project.

Megan Williams (she/her) is the KU Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity’s program coordinator. Meg earned her PhD in American Studies from KU. To her position at the Emily Taylor Center, Meg brings over a decade of experience teaching women, gender, and sexuality studies to undergraduates at KU and Johnson County Community College in Kansas and at Skidmore College and The College of Saint Rose in Upstate NY.

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